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René Van Someren

The Elementary Model of Organisational Processes (EMOP): The essentials of all organisations, and how they mutually correlate.


Posted May 3, 2017

Adapted from:
Van Someren, R., 2014, Aptitude and Attitude as Constraints and Enablers in Organisation Development: An Elementary Model of Organisational Processes, The Hague, Van Someren, ISBN/EAN: 9789079641086

Van Someren, R., 2016, Fundamentals of Organisations, The Hague, Van Someren, ISBN/EAN: 9789079641109


See also: René Van Someren's blog.




Some time ago, I obtained my Ph.D. on an interdisciplinary dissertation. Three main subjects that I addressed in that dissertation are:

  1. Thought to Behaviour (TtB). Even though there has been much agreement for quite some time about the importance of attitudes in bringing about human behaviour, it still seemed unclear how this actually works. Thought to Behaviour is proposed to serve as an integrative explanation of human behaviour.

  2. The Elementary Model of Organisational Processes (EMOP). This model is the result of identification of aspects that are essential to all organisations, regardless of their type or size. The model also illustrates how those organisational aspects tend to correlate with one another.

  3. The Elementary Model Questionnaire (EMQ). By inferring organisation members’ attitudes towards elementary aspects, identified in EMOP, the EMQ serves to quantify organisational behaviour.
  EMOP is illustrated in the image above. The following is a brief sketch of EMOP. It consists of the following variable elements:

Structure
Structure is illustrated as the double sphere at the left-hand side of the model. It consists of the structure components 'Leadership' and 'Applied Technology'. This is where most organisational processes start and from where many of them are directed and controlled. A boss issues an order, an order is received by telephone, E-mail or another computer application; organisation members are given verbal or written directions on how to perform certain tasks, and so on.

Trust & Confidence
Each organisation member attributes a certain amount of trust and confidence to him/herself, his or her colleagues, leaders, clients, abilities, information, applied technology, et cetera. Trust is attributed via perception and emotions, not by factuality.

Emotions & Mood
Someone who is in a good mood may act differently than he or she does while being in a bad mood. Mood and emotions affect organisation members’ behaviour both during social interaction and while acting alone.

Aptitude
For organisational processes in general, important relevant aptitudes relate to:
a. Understanding leadership directives, translating those directives into appropriate action and acting accordingly;
b. Utilising available tools effectively and efficiently, to achieve commensurable goals.

Human behaviour
No organisation can exist without human behaviour. Human beings play a pivotal role in EMOP. In EMOP, organisation members are not regarded as mere labour providers, but as human beings that trust, feel, know and act. This comes with acknowledging limitations to all aspects of human beings, such as to what they can learn, can do, or will do, under various circumstances.

Circumstance
Circumstance, or contingency, can affect any organisational process, but the extent to which this exists may vary from negligible, non-existent to high, or even dramatic. Circumstance can affect organisational processes indirectly, directly, or both, and effects of circumstance can be incidental, temporal or structural. Circumstance surrounds and affects all other EMOP elements.

Outcomes
In EMOP, outcomes are regarded as both tangible and intangible results and consequences of organisational processes, and of combinations of organisational processes. For example, outcomes can be measured as revenues, waste products, employee turnover, organisation members’ job satisfaction, and so on.

The bars in the EMOP image, interlinking all EMOP spheres, illustrate how the EMOP elements tend to correlate with one another. These correlations differ from organisation to organisation, and vary from time to time.

Knowing these correlations of organisations or organisational units is valuable, especially when each EMOP element is quantified. For instance, if at a certain moment the EMOP element Emotions & Mood has a low value, a strong link between that element and the EMOP structure component Applied Technology would give a valuable clue when searching for a cause for low Emotions & Mood.

To a certain degree, such information reflects organisational behaviour. This information can have many different applications, such as diagnostics, monitoring and evaluation of organisational events or interventions.

The Elementary Model Questionnaire (EMQ) serves to quantify EMOP elements. As such, it can serve to generate various information, for instance, enabling one to determine how strongly certain EMOP elements are linked to one another.


Content of this posting is taken from:
Van Someren, R., 2016, Fundamentals of Organisations, The Hague, Van Someren, ISBN/EAN: 9789079641109

Van Someren, R., 2014, Aptitude and Attitude as Constraints and Enablers in Organisation Development: An Elementary Model of Organisational Processes, The Hague, Van Someren, ISBN/EAN: 9789079641086


René Van Someren’s personal website is: www.vansomeren.org

René Van Someren's blog


                    



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